Lime Rock Snowcross

Lime Rock Snowcross   Lime Rock Snowcross 

 

Lime Rock snowcross

Lime Rock Drivers Club members test the track’s groomed autocross area. Photos by Rick Roso and Casey Keil. Conventional wisdom says that winter marks the end of the competitive driving season, unless one lives in a place cold enough to offer ice racing, like Norway or Minnesota, or a place warm enough that winter exists only on prime-time news. Last year, Connecticut’s Lime Rock Park decided to change this by offering an autocross series that spanned the seasons from winter through fall, with events held regardless of weather conditions. This year, the track has taken things one step further: Thanks to the addition of snowmaking equipment, it will be offering true winter autocross sessions on a snow-packed (and groomed) track. Lime Rock Snowcross Lime Rock tests its snowmaking equipment on December 12, 2014. We attended a January 2014 autocross session at Lime Rock and turned it into a feature in the May 2014 issue of Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car magazine. Though the weather was cold, it wasn’t snowing, something that Rick Roso, the track’s director of editorial, press and PR, regretted. He even admitted that Lime Rock was considering adding snow-making equipment to its dedicated autocross track, but that seemed like little more than wishful thinking at the time. Race tracks, after all, are businesses with steep overhead and seasonal profitability, making such a large investment in seasonal infrastructure seem unlikely. Lime Rock snowcross The MINI is well suited to winter autocross. Enter the Lime Rock Drivers Club (LRDC), whose members thought that adding snowmaking equipment sounded like a great idea. Connections were made, equipment was acquired, and as a result, LRDC members get a winter playground on which to safely hone their driving skills. Snowmaking and surface grooming at the facility began in mid-December, and the initial track sessions began the same month. The LRDC’s improvements work out well for the rest of us, too, as Lime Rock has opened up the winter autocross series to drivers of all ages and abilities, with sessions planned for Fridays and Saturdays through March (or, realistically, as long as it remains cold enough to make snow). The entry fee for each event is $300, which includes professional instruction from one of the track’s Skip Barber School drivers, a lot of laps throughout the day, and access to a heated chateau with restrooms, hot beverages and snacks. Lime Rock snowcross Instructor Don Drislane (center) supervises an LRDC session. Snowcross, as winter autocross is also called, is an excellent way to learn or sharpen winter driving skills, and Lime Rock’s 1,200-foot autocross area provides ample run-off should things get out of control. Sessions typically see three or four cars on the track at any given time, which allows sufficient spacing for safety. Wondering how a 2014 Mustang GT would fare on a tight, snow-packed autocross course? A 2011 Volkswagen GTI? 

e Rock Drivers Club members test the track’s groomed autocross area. Photos by Rick Roso and Casey Keil.

Conventional wisdom says that winter marks the end of the competitive driving season, unless one lives in a place cold enough to offer ice racing, like Norway or Minnesota, or a place warm enough that winter exists only on prime-time news. Last year, Connecticut’s Lime Rock Park decided to change this by offering an autocross series that spanned the seasons from winter through fall, with events held regardless of weather conditions. This year, the track has taken things one step further: Thanks to the addition of snowmaking equipment, it will be offering true winter autocross sessions on a snow-packed (and groomed) track.

Lime Rock Snowcross

Lime Rock tests its snowmaking equipment on December 12, 2014.

We attended a January 2014 autocross session at Lime Rock and turned it into a feature in the May 2014 issue of Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car magazine. Though the weather was cold, it wasn’t snowing, something that Rick Roso, the track’s director of editorial, press and PR, regretted. He even admitted that Lime Rock was considering adding snow-making equipment to its dedicated autocross track, but that seemed like little more than wishful thinking at the time. Race tracks, after all, are businesses with steep overhead and seasonal profitability, making such a large investment in seasonal infrastructure seem unlikely.

Lime Rock snowcross

The MINI is well suited to winter autocross.

Enter the Lime Rock Drivers Club (LRDC), whose members thought that adding snowmaking equipment sounded like a great idea. Connections were made, equipment was acquired, and as a result, LRDC members get a winter playground on which to safely hone their driving skills. Snowmaking and surface grooming at the facility began in mid-December, and the initial track sessions began the same month.

The LRDC’s improvements work out well for the rest of us, too, as Lime Rock has opened up the winter autocross series to drivers of all ages and abilities, with sessions planned for Fridays and Saturdays through March (or, realistically, as long as it remains cold enough to make snow). The entry fee for each event is $300, which includes professional instruction from one of the track’s Skip Barber School drivers, a lot of laps throughout the day, and access to a heated chateau with restrooms, hot beverages and snacks.

Lime Rock snowcross

Instructor Don Drislane (center) supervises an LRDC session.

Snowcross, as winter autocross is also called, is an excellent way to learn or sharpen winter driving skills, and Lime Rock’s 1,200-foot autocross area provides ample run-off should things get out of control. Sessions typically see three or four cars on the track at any given time, which allows sufficient spacing for safety.

Wondering how a 2014 Mustang GT would fare on a tight, snow-packed autocross course? A 2011 Volkswagen GTI? Look for first-person coverage coming in the Hemmings Daily, as well as in upcoming issues of Hemmings Muscle Machines and Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car.

- See more at: http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2015/01/13/new-at-connecticuts-lime-rock-park-autocrossing-on-snow/?refer=news#sthash.QT9vHWt9.dpuf

 

Lime Rock Drivers Club members test the track’s groomed autocross area. Photos by Rick Roso and Casey Keil.

Conventional wisdom says that winter marks the end of the competitive driving season, unless one lives in a place cold enough to offer ice racing, like Norway or Minnesota, or a place warm enough that winter exists only on prime-time news. Last year, Connecticut’s Lime Rock Park decided to change this by offering an autocross series that spanned the seasons from winter through fall, with events held regardless of weather conditions. This year, the track has taken things one step further: Thanks to the addition of snowmaking equipment, it will be offering true winter autocross sessions on a snow-packed (and groomed) track.

Lime Rock Snowcross

Lime Rock tests its snowmaking equipment on December 12, 2014.

We attended a January 2014 autocross session at Lime Rock and turned it into a feature in the May 2014 issue of Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car magazine. Though the weather was cold, it wasn’t snowing, something that Rick Roso, the track’s director of editorial, press and PR, regretted. He even admitted that Lime Rock was considering adding snow-making equipment to its dedicated autocross track, but that seemed like little more than wishful thinking at the time. Race tracks, after all, are businesses with steep overhead and seasonal profitability, making such a large investment in seasonal infrastructure seem unlikely.

Lime Rock snowcross

The MINI is well suited to winter autocross.

Enter the Lime Rock Drivers Club (LRDC), whose members thought that adding snowmaking equipment sounded like a great idea. Connections were made, equipment was acquired, and as a result, LRDC members get a winter playground on which to safely hone their driving skills. Snowmaking and surface grooming at the facility began in mid-December, and the initial track sessions began the same month.

The LRDC’s improvements work out well for the rest of us, too, as Lime Rock has opened up the winter autocross series to drivers of all ages and abilities, with sessions planned for Fridays and Saturdays through March (or, realistically, as long as it remains cold enough to make snow). The entry fee for each event is $300, which includes professional instruction from one of the track’s Skip Barber School drivers, a lot of laps throughout the day, and access to a heated chateau with restrooms, hot beverages and snacks.

Lime Rock snowcross

Instructor Don Drislane (center) supervises an LRDC session.

Snowcross, as winter autocross is also called, is an excellent way to learn or sharpen winter driving skills, and Lime Rock’s 1,200-foot autocross area provides ample run-off should things get out of control. Sessions typically see three or four cars on the track at any given time, which allows sufficient spacing for safety.

 

http://news.barrett-jackson.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/GordonCar.jpg

 

Jeff Gordon and former crew chief Ray Evernham will team up again in 2015. On Jan. 16 in Scottsdale, Arizona, the duo will auction off their final race-winning car at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale. Proceeds from the sale of the 1999 No. 24 Pepsi Chevrolet Monte Carlo that won the inaugural NASCAR XFINITY Series (then known as the NASCAR Busch Series) race at Phoenix International Raceway will benefit Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation. http://news.barrett-jackson.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/GordonCar.jpg In 1999, Gordon/Evernham Motorsports (GEM) was formed to compete in six NASCAR XFINITY Series races with Gordon as driver and Evernham as crew chief. "It was fun to create a new team with Ray and forge a stronger relationship with Pepsi," said Gordon. "It was cool to work with Ray in that capacity, and that car was so memorable. And to think that was our final race win together. "I've had the pleasure of being associated with past charitable cars that have been auctioned at Barrett-Jackson, and I can't wait to be there next week when this car is on the block." Evernham hosts Velocity's AmeriCarna, and the television series will feature the restoration and sale of this 1999 No. 24 Chevrolet (Lot No. 3007; scheduled to be auctioned at 7 p.m. local time) during an upcoming episode. "The heart of AmeriCarna is uncovering long-lost four-wheeled treasures that played a large part in a person's past," said Evernham, who guided Gordon to three championships and 47 victories as crew chief of the No. 24 Hendrick Motorsports NASCAR Cup Series entry. "The No. 24 car has been an unmistakable artifact of my career and holds a unique spot in NASCAR history. Reviving the car's championship glory with my long-time friend has been a labor of love. "We're proud to revisit its history in an upcoming episode of AmeriCarna, and I'm looking forward to being a part of this great event when we auction the car to benefit Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation." Gordon began supporting organizations such as the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society early in his NASCAR career, and the diagnosis of Evernham's son with leukemia in 1992 inspired Gordon to establish his foundation in hopes of helping children facing critical illnesses realize their dreams. What started as a small project driven by one special child has grown into an organization that has granted more than $15 million for children's charities. "I'm so proud of what the foundation has been able to accomplish, but there is so much that still needs to be done," Gordon said. "I just want to thank Ray, Barrett-Jackson and everyone involved in this project. The proceeds from this sale will make a tremendous impact on the lives of many children battling cancer." About Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation was established as a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization in 1999 by the four-time NASCAR Cup Series champion. The foundation supports children battling cancer by funding pediatric medical research dedicated to finding a cure and treatment programs that increase survivorship. www.jeffgordonchildrensfoundation.org - See more at: http://motorn.com/news_full.php?id=360#sthash.afL7YMMv.dpuf

This is a must have product for engine builders and owner's who want more life out of their flat tappet  high horsepower motors. The classic and antique motors need this product as it reduces friction coefficient dramatically in a way of not hurting the motors as an additive. Read the article on why you should be using this product and not others.  This product has shown horsepower increase on the engine dyno.

                                

 

You’ve most likely heard of engine additives that reduce engine wear. Most of which are useless in real world applications for long term use because of one main ingredient. Here are the dangers of chlorinated paraffin additives…

A modern day engineThe Dangers of Chlorinated Paraffin Additives

Unless you’re Amish, you’ve no doubt heard somebody somewhere, extolling the benefits of some magic engine additive that reduces engine wear. However, most of them are about as effective as Dr. BillyBob’s Miracle Snake Oil. Now that’s not to say that all additives are hogwash, because some of them do work. But what makes them work can sometimes do more harm to your engine than good. Case in point: Chlorinated Paraffins.

It’s All About Ridges and Valleys

When an internal combustion engine is running, large chunks of metal are spinning around at  a very high rate of speed. This movement naturally creates heat, which the motor oil removes as it passes by the parts. As the engine ages, microscopic “ridges and valleys” form on the metal surface. These deformations get worse over time, and are commonly referred to as ‘engine wear’.

As the metal bits slide against each other, these “ridges and valleys” cause friction, which increases their size, and creates more heat, thus reducing the service life of the oil. To reduce this effect, chemical additives are added to the motor oil. These chemicals are designed to bond to the metal surfaces, filling in the abrasions, and creating a smooth surface for the metal parts to slide against. However, the additives used in most oil isn’t very effective in high-stress applications like fleet use, or performance / race driving. That’s why additives have become so popular.

What Are Chlorinated Paraffin Additives?

A common component of many additives is chlorinated paraffin. These chlorinated hydrocarbons are created by adding chlorine to a paraffin obtained through petroleum distillation, which results in hydrochloric acid. Once the acid is removed, stabilizers are added, and the product can be used as a friction reducer in an additive.

As the oil heats up, the chlorine reacts with the metal, creating a metal chloride film on the surface. This obviously covers those ‘ridges and valleys’, reducing friction between the moving parts. But once the chlorine has bonded to the metal, the hydrocarbons turn into sludge, and the excess chlorine can react with trace soluble metals in the oil, creating hydrochloric acid once again. This chlorinated paraffin depletes the alkaline in the oil, causing the oil to break down much faster than it should. Chlorine also eats away at rubber, neoprene and cork, which are the main components of engine seals.

Besides reducing the service life of your motor oil, and cracking or hardening the rear main seal, valve stem seals, and other critical engine seals, that hydrochloric acid can damage ferrous metals and aluminum alloys, turning them an ugly yellow color. Chlorinated paraffins don’t dissolve in water either, turning the used motor containing them into hazardous waste. All in all, chlorinated paraffin should be avoided at all costs.

Can Engine Additives Work Without Using Chlorinated Paraffins?

Although chlorinated paraffin additives do more harm to an engine than good, there are additives on the market that can reduce friction without using chlorinated paraffin at all. EFS Combust EMT for example, uses stabilizing antioxidants and unique metal deactivators to create a synergistic extreme pressure composition without altering the chemical makeup of the oil. This is the winning formula used by many NHRA Top Alcohol race teams to protect their very expensive engines and critical gear components. As the oil carries the additive through the motor / gears, a covalent bond is formed with the metal. The friction-reducing film that results… is bonded to, by penetrating the metal 2 to 4 microns deep. By contrast, the film created by chlorinated paraffin additives, merely sit on the surface.

Products like EFS Combust  EMT (Engine Metal Treatment) have been found to reduce friction and extend engine life, without creating acidic / corrosive by-products. And that allows you to protect your engine, without harming it in the longrun. Aka: a win-win situation.

 


                                                        
 

 

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